Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
_Ray

Figure it out

12 posts in this topic

So, if I were to post this binary code:

087 097 115 117 112 044 032 116 104 105 115 032 105 115 032 082 097 121 098 111 098 032 112 111 115 116 105 110 103 032 099 114 097 112 032 105 110 032 066 105 110 097 114 121 032 116 111 032 115 101 101 032 105 102 032 121 111 117 032 099 097 110 032 114 101 097 100 032 105 116 033 000 000 000 000 000 000 000 000 000

Would anybody be able to tell me what it says? (Hint: It's just text) :hurrhurr:

It's Decimal 1-byte at a time.

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

FAILBOAT OH MY.

WRX is right, binary code is only 0's and 1's.

In a fixed-width binary code, each letter, digit, or other character, is represented by a bit string of the same length; that bit string, interpreted as a binary number, is usually displayed in code tables in octal, decimal or hexadecimal notation.

Wikipedia doesn't lie.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Binary can be in Octal, Hexadecimal, or Decimal form.

bahahahaha

Completely false. You mean that numbers can be expressed in Binary, Ternary, Octal, Hex, Decimal etc. The number twelve is 12 in decimal, 1100 in binary, C in hex etc.

Binary, decimal and hex just represent numbers, they can't show text. You need a separate rule for a certain number to mean a certain letter. So following ASCII rules, the number 65 in decimal (41 hex or 0101 binary) means the letter A.

So using ASCII rules, your first four decimal numbers (087 097 115 117 112) translate to the letters "Wasup"

There's nothing to do with binary or hex in your question.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0